Bonds

Reliable Bond Services

Different Types of Bonds Available

There are three different types of bonds available; personal bonds, cash deposit bonds, and surety bonds. It may also be possible to reinstate a bond that has previously been forfeited if the court has not yet taken a judgment on the bond forfeiture.

Forfeited Bonds and Reinstatement

If a bond that has been forfeited cannot be reinstated, you must post a new bond to clear the warrant or to secure the defendant’s release from jail. Most courts will not approve a new personal bond if the prior bond has been forfeited. If a bond forfeiture results in a civil judgment, it may have an effect on the defendant’s future credit status.

If the civil suit on the bond forfeiture has not yet gone to judgment, it can usually be settled by paying an agreed judgment of between $300 to $450. The bond may then be reinstated without the need to do a walk-thru.

Bond Amounts on Probation Revocations

Regarding bonds on probation revocations, unless the probation violation is administrative, most judges will require either a cash deposit or a surety bond and will not approve a personal bond for the case. If the original case for which the defendant was placed on probation is a felony, the bond amount will most likely not be set on the probation violation at the time that the warrant is issued. An attorney must first approach the judge of a court in which the case was filed and request that a bond be set. In felony cases in which the defendant was originally placed on a deferred adjudication, the judge is required to set a reasonable bond upon the request of the defendant’s attorney.

What If No Bond Amount Is Set?

If no bond amount is set, an attorney may approach a judge and request that a bond be set.

Where the defendant was originally placed on a regular probation, by law, no bond is required to be set. At the request of the defense attorney, the judge may set a bond amount depending on the severity of the probation violation. In certain situations, the judge may agree to simply recall the warrant in lieu of the posting of a bond. In felony cases in which the defendant was originally placed on a deferred adjudication, the judge is required to set a reasonable bond upon the request of the defendant’s attorney.

On all personal and cash deposit bonds, the judge may attach certain conditions such as counseling, mandatory keep away instructions or any other condition that he deems necessary to ensure the safety of the community.
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